Archive | Features

The April 18, 2014 Issue of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The April 18, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

The March 21, 2014 issue

Page 1:

  • BOF Reverses Decision, Adds Constable Back – by Bob Moore
  • Town Budgets Moving Forward

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar 

Page 3:

  • Pleasant Valley Drive-In – Auction Slated To Raise Funds For Projector
  • For The Love Of Jack Fund – Tag Sale To Raise Funds For Animals’ Medical Needs 
  • Community Notes: 
    • Backyard Small Chicken Flock Management Program 
    • CHH Offers Free Smoking Cessation Program
    • Workshop Explores Nursing As A Career Path For Men
    • Weekly Pajama Story Time At The Beekley Library
    • New Hartford RTC Hosting Candidates Meet & Greet

Page 4:

  • Gearheads Win In Boston, Head For Championships - by Megan Llewellyn
  • Barkhamsted’s One Room Schoolhouse Summer Hours
  • Community Notes:
    • Clothing And White Elephant Sale At Trinita
    • LWV Schedules International Lunch
    • Farmington Valley Trout Unlimited May Meeting
    • Charlotte Hungerford Offers Free Mammogram Day

Page 5:

  • Barkhamsted Earth Day Nature Festival: Celebrating All Things Natural
  • Brewed & Bottled: Of Beer Fests & Oyster Bars - by Chris Parrott
  • Help Prepare A Land Trust Property for Public Access

Page 6:

  • Ellis Paul To Close Season 7 At The Nights At The Beekley
  • The Jerry Carillo Ensemble At The Beekley Library

Page 7:

  • Mark Swenson’s Map Of The Upper Farmington

Page 8:

  • New Hartford Town Hall Staff Moving Back into Renovated Offices
  • Business Services Section

Page 9:

  • Attorney General’s Report on Hospital Facility Fees Encourages Legislative Action
  • Business Services Section

Page 10:

  • Obituaries
  • Could The ‘Shared Solar’ Movemen Work In Shady Connecticut?
  • Spike In Customer Complaints Spurs Regulatory Action – PURA And The Companies Engaged In The Retail Electricity Market Place

Page 11: 

  • Find Out How Your Federal Tax Dollars Are Spent
  • Legal Notices
  • Classifieds

Page 12:

  • Historical Notes – ‘Baaahhh: Time For A Haircut’: Sheep Shearing And The Role Of Sheep In New England - by Anne Hall

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the April 18 issue.  ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors! Thank you, Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

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The April 11 Issue Of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The April 11, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

The March 21, 2014 issue

Page 1:

  • Justin Lucas Receives The Carmella Lattizori Book Award
  • New Hartford Budget Public Hearing A Quiet Affair – by Bob Moore
  • Husky Parade

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar 

Page 3:

  • Beekley Community Library Appoints New Director
  • Community Notes: 
    • Barkhamsted Rec. Sponsors Spring Fling 
    • Barkhamsted Rec. Sponsors Mother’s Day Cake Decorating Event
    • Art Classes Begin Again At NH Senior Center
    • Backyard Small Chicken Flock Management
    • Antique Appraisal Program At Beardsley & Memorial Library
    • Cyberbullying  - A Community Conversation

Page 4:

  • Regional’s Gearheads Are On A Roll To Northeast Championships – by Tom Goddu
  • Roxanne Pangallo Appointed Principal Of New Hartford Elementary, Bakerville Schools
  • How Much Does The State Owe School Districts?
  • Creatively Wired and Socially Challenged - Autism Spectrum Unplugged

Page 5:

  • Senior Spotlight: 91 Year-Old Plaintiff Sues Long-Term Care Insurance Provider – by Carmine Perri
  • Brewed & Bottled: Hunting Rarities – by Chris Parrott

Page 6:

  • Cooking With Chef Chris Snieckus – A Twist On An Old Favorite, Southwestern Macaroni & Cheese - by Chris Snieckus
  • 5 Things – Five Tips For A Greener Wash – by Monica Reid

Page 7:

  • Feature – Riverton Derby: A Tradition For 64 Years - by Donna Howard

Page 8:

  • New Office Space To House New Business (Edward Jones) - Business Shout Out by Maria Moore
  • Tenants, Landlords: Know Your Rights & Responsibilities
  • Business Services Section

Page 9:

  • State Reaches Agreement To Help Protect Working Farms
  • Business Council, NW Chamber To Host Joint Spring Fling
  • Women’s Network To Meet At Whiting Mills
  • Business Services Section

Page 10:

  • Memorial: Arlene Swift Jones
  • Op-Ed: Buyers Beware (of Common Core) - by Ann Policelli Cronin

Page 11: 

  • Heartbleed Bug – What You Need To Know
  • Nurse Practitioners To Practice Independent Of Doctors
  • Feds Release Medicare Doctor Payment Database
  • Classifieds

Page 12:

  • Historical Notes – ‘Americas First Prima Donna’: Clara Louise Kellogg – by Anne Hall

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the April 11 issue.  ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors! Thank you, Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

The April 4 Issue Of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The April 4, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

The March 21, 2014 issue

Page 1:

  • New Hartford WPCA Meeting: Septage Contract Ended, Sewer Grant Discussed – by Bob Moore:

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar
  • MDC Annual Watershed Inspections Begin in April
  • Lessons From a Forest Kindergarten

Page 3:

  • New Hartford Budget Readied For Public Hearing – by Bob Moore
  • Bakerville Library: New Librarian, New Website Announced
  • Colebrook Store Closed Once Again
  • Community Notes 
    • American Legion Sponsors Walk-A-Thon
    • Invitation To Death Cafe New Hartford

Page 4:

  • Northwestern Regional #7 2nd Quarter Honor Roll (High School)
  • Regional’s Swim Team On A Winning Streak - by Jaclyn Colombie

Page 5:

  • Connecticut Court Ruling Places A Divide Between Horses And People – by Anne Hall

Page 6:

  • A Taste Of Our Favorite Farmers Market - Photos by Maria Moore

Page 7:

  • Northwest Conservation District Earth Day Plant Sale Returns To Goshen Fairgrounds

Page 8:

  • Pleasant Valley Hair: Specializing In Hair Cuts & Smiles - Business Shout Out by Maria Moore
  • Northwest Community Bank, New Supervisor For Academic Branch
  • Free Estate Planning Seminars Offered By Elder Law, Estate Planning Firm

Page 9:

  • Business Services

Page 10:

  • Letter To the Editor
  • Op-Ed: How Is CT’s Health Insurance Exchange Really Doing? – by Ellen Andrews

Page 11: 

  • State’s Open Data Portal Launches
  • UConn Aids Out-Of-State Students
  • Classifieds & Legal Notices

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the April 4 issue.

 ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors!

Thank you,

Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

The March 28 Issue Of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The March 28, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

The March 21, 2014 issue

Page 1:

  • State Allocates 3.7 Mil. To Cottage St. Sewer Project
  • New Hartford BOF Trims Proposed Budgets - by Bob Moore
  • Principal Mike Luzietti Accepts Position In Simsbury - By Maria Moore

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar
  • The Grapevine

Page 3:

  • Community Notes
  • Marijuana Dispensary Approved At Ex-KFC Location 

Page 4:

  • Northwestern Regional #7 2nd Quarter Honor Roll
  • Regional’s “Gearheads” Advance - by Megan Llewellyn
  • Raise The Roof For A School Pavilion
  • Barkhamsted School PTO To Sponsor Penny Auction

Page 5:

  • UConn To Raise Tuition 6.5 Percent Next Year
  • Out & About: Lifestar On Call
  • 5 Things – Homemade Cleaning Products For Spring - by Monica Reid

Page 6:

  • Hot Soup For Those Chilly Nights, Shrimp Corn Chowder - by Chef Chris Snieckus

Page 7:

  • Connecticut’s Sugar Maples: icons Of New England - by Anne C.  Hall

Page 8:

  • What Is Anthropology? Two Anthropologists’ Takes - Photojournal by Maria Moore

Page 9:

  • Business Council’s Intern Program Looks Forward To 2014-2015 Semesters
  • Business Services

Page 10:

  • Obituary – Raymond Charest
  • Yes Dan Malloy/Nancy Wyman Are Running
  • Committee: No Plans To Vote On Aid-In-Dying Bill
  • Free Dental Clinic, Finally Comes To Hartford

Page 11: 

  • Connecticut Becomes First State To Pass $10.10 Minimum Wage
  • Classifieds

Page 12:

  • DEEP Shines A Spotlight On Connecticut’s Native Salamander Species

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the March 14 issue.

 ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors!

Thank you,

Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

The March 21 Issue Of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The March 21, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

The March 21, 2014 issue

Page 1:

  • New Hartford, Barkhamsted Budgets Presented - by Bob Moore
  • Grand List Values Decline Due To Revaluations – by Maria Moore
  • Ripley Hill Rd. To Be Closed March 24-28 Daytime

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar

Page 3:

  • Community Notes
  • Grand Lists Decline (continued) including top 10 taxpayers 

Page 4:

  • Cooking With Chef Chris Sniekus: Easy Left Overs: Corned Beef Hash – CORRECTED RECIPE
  • A Craft Beer Selfie - by Chris Parrott

Page 5:

  • Out & About: Images From St. Patrick’s Day
  • Drive-In Fundraiser Planned - by Bob Moore
  • A Workshop To Help Writers Establish Online Credibility

Page 6:

  • Business Shoutout:  The Purple Rose Opens Just In Time For Spring - by Maria Moore
  • Business Services Section

Page 7:

  • Common Core And Smarter Balanced: Local Concerns Expressed
  • Classifieds & Legals

Page 8:

  • Historical Notes: Barkhansted Hollow Before The Saville Dam  - by Anne Hall

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the March 14 issue.

 ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors!

Thank you,

Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

The March 14, 2014 Issue Of The (NH+) Independent Is Available For Download

The March 14, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

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Page 1:

  • Antiques: Objects Of Age & Beauty – by Anne Hall
  • New Hartford Budget Workshop: Regional #7, NH Schools BOE, Board Of Selectmen To Present Budgets
  • WPCA Municipal Loan Repayment: BOF, BOS Back 10-Year Plan - by Bob Moore

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar

Page 3:

  • Community Notes
  • Local Coaching Heroes Honored - by Jaclyn Colombie

Page 4:

  • Cooking With Chef Chris Sniekus: Easy Left Overs: Corned Beef Hash – for CORRECTED RECIPE click on the following link (to be inserted)
  • Out & About: Scottish Highlands Music & Dance Comes To Town

Page 5:

  • Out & About: On The Slopes With Hartford PAL
  • ‘Ugly Places For Pretty Birds’: Shrubland Birds In Connecticut - by Anne Hall

Page 6:

  • Business After Hours: Quercibella Thronged By Fellow Business Owners
  • Business Services Section 

Page 7:

  • Op-Ed: Common Core: An Unproven ‘Reform’ Movement
  • Classifieds & Legals

Page 8:

  • Historical Notes: Antiques: Valuing Objects Of Age & Beauty (continued from page 1)  - Anne Hall

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the March 14 issue.

 ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors!

Thank you,

Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

The March 7, 2014 Issue Of The Independent

The March 7, 2014 issue of The (NH+) Independent is available for download. Click on the front-page image below:

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Page 1:

  • New Rec. Commission Holds First Meeting
  • New Hartford Land Use Officer Accepts Job In Torrington
  • WPCA Adopts 5-Point Debt Relief Program – by Bob Moore

Page 2:

  • Community Calendar
  • NH Selectmen Take First Pass At Budget
  • Regional #7 Ponders Cuts to Proposed Budget

Page 3:

  • Community Notes
  • Local Education: Prevalence Data For Students With Disabilities - by Maria Moore

Page 4:

  • 5 Things: Things To Do For Daylight Savings Time - by Monica Reid
  • New Hartford PTO: Red Barn Will Star In Silent Auction – by Martha Busemeyer
  • Out & About: Cub Scout Packs Race To Finish!

Page 5:

  • Volunteer Emergency Services: A Gala To Rally The Troops - by Ben Silano

Page 6:

  • Volunteer Emergency Services: A Gala To Rally The Troops – by Ben Silano

 

  • Business: Morning Mingler at Chapin Park B&B
  • Business Services Section
  • Obituaries: Diane Adele Fontana; Charles J. Clairmont; Viona (Palmer) Cleveland

 

Page 7:

  • Classifieds

Page 8:

  • Historical Notes: New Hartford Barns Join State Register Of Historic Places  - by Donna Howard
  • My Home Is Antique: Is It Historically Significant Enough To Be Registered? - by Anne Hall

Download a copy of the pdf to read all the news in the March 7 issue.

 ~ Please Patronize Our Advertisers – And Be Sure To Let Them Know That You Saw Their Ad In The NH+ Independent ~

DO YOU ENJOY READING THE NH+ INDEPENDENT?

If you enjoy reading our weekly newspaper – online or mailed to you – please consider donating $1 (or more!) to help support the production and distribution of The (NH+) Independent:

  • Use our PayPal account to make a donation using your debit or credit card
  • Mail your check/money order/cash donation to: The NH+ Independent, PO Box 667, New Hartford CT 06057
  • Drop off your donation in our mail box outside our office at 537 Main Street (side porch) in New Hartford Center.

Help support local news that’s locally produced by your friends and neighbors!

Thank you,

Maria & Bob & The NH+ Independent Crew

 

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March 2 Edition Of NH+ INDEPENDENT Available For Download

The March 2 Edition of the NH+ INDEPENDENT is  now available for download from the link in our sidebar, or by clicking on the image below.

 

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Click on the image above to download a copy of the March 2 Edition of the NH+ INDEPENDENT.

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Brewed & Bottled: Not All Calories Are Wasted

Chris Parrott

There’s long been a debate amongst beer drinkers, whether or not dark beer contains more calories than its lighter counterpart. There have been ad campaigns based on the subject, and breweries solely devoted to convincing you that their beer has the fewest calories on the market, but at what cost?

I’m here to let you know that a beer’s caloric footprint is not about the color of the brew, but more directly correlated to the amount of alcohol in the beer, its ABV (alcohol by volume). Perhaps, somewhere, some reader just dropped his Natural Light and gasped, but there’s no need for alarm. It is true that beers such as porters, IPAs and Scotch ales tend to contain more calories than lagers or pilsners, but there are exceptions. Let’s first take a look at four popular light beers on the market.

After ten minutes of exhaustive research, I collected this interesting data. Bear in mind that these figures are based on a 12 oz bottled beer. One of the lightest beers on the market is Michelob Ultra, containing 95 calories and an ABV of 4.1%. Not surprisingly, Miller Lite is a close second, with 96 calories and an ABV of 4.2%. When it comes to Budweiser and Bud Light there’s a fairly sizeable difference between the two: Bud Light contains 110 calories per bottle and is 4.2% ABV, whereas Budweiser contains 145 calories per bottle and is 5% ABV. With a difference of 35 calories per bottle, a few extra Buds will add up. Yet, you’d be hard pressed to find a full bodied ale comparable to those beers calorically. The only problem is you must sacrifice a beer’s strength, and in my drinking opinion, taste, to achieve that low of a calorie count.

Fat-tire-scene_flOnce I moved past the light beer and into the world of ale, the plot certainly thickened. Consider the Flying Dog Brewing Company, which produces a wheat beer they lovingly call In-Heat Wheat. This brew contains an ABV of 4.7% and only 138 calories. For a little less alcohol, In-Heat Wheat has 7 calories less than a Budweiser. If you’re not into wheaties, then perhaps New Belgium Fat Tire Ale will do the trick. Coming in at 160 calories and an ABV of 5.2%, this full figured pale ale is quite delicious and won’t knock you too far over a 2000 calorie diet. Fat Tire looks even better when you learn that Sierra Nevada Pale Ale contains 175 calories and isn’t much stronger.

Still, some beer-lovers need something even darker, which is where the ace up my sleeve comes into play, in the form of the old standby, Guinness Draught. This beloved Irish stout clocks in at 4.2% ABV and only 126 calories. Take that Buzz Lightbeer! If the pub session goes a bit longer than you thought, have a Guinness and don’t fret about what part of your body it’s going to add itself to later.

As I mentioned previously, a beer’s calorie count relies more on the ABV than on its hue, and some folks want a brew that packs a punch. So if you’re planning on having an Anchor Steam Porter (209 calories, 5.6% ABV) or a McEwan’s Scotch Ale (295 calories, 9.5% ABV), just keep in mind that you’ll be taking in a few more calories than your lower ABV friends.

In case you’re keeping score at home, I thought I’d also include the beer with one of the highest calorie counts on the market. Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barleywine contains a meaty 330 calories per bottle and is over 11% ABV. A few bottles of this monster beer will definitely go to your hips, but I’m guessing if you’re out to drink barleywine, caloric intake is probably on the backburner of your mind. Slainte!

Chris Parrott has been brewing beer almost since he was legally able to. When he’s not writing about beer, Chris is serving it up at his family’s pub in the Ledgebrook Plaza just over the Barkhamsted line in Winsted. You may write to Chris at newhartfordplus@gmail.com and write “Brew” in the subject line.

This article first appeared in the December 29 edition of the NH+ INDEPENDENT, the weekly newspaper published by the NewHartfordPlus crew.

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

Santa’s Journey Around The World 2012: NORAD Tracks Santa

While the NewHartfordPlus Crew is taking time to celebrate Christmas with our families, we want to share with you a 50-year-plus tradition at NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command): that of tracking Santa’s Christmas Eve flight. We hope you enjoy this wonderful reminder of the goodwill that makes Christmas such a special holiday for us all, Christians and non-Christians alike. “Merry Christmas!” and “Happy Holidays” to everyone who stops by NewHartfordPlus this Christmas, Maria and Bob Moore.

To follow Santa on his journey around the world, click the image below to visit the NORAD Santa Tracker site.

NORAD’s connection with Santa:

Why NORAD tracks Santa:

For more than 50 years, NORAD and its predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD) have tracked Santa’s flight.

Col. Harry Shoup, NORAD's first Santa tracker

The tradition began in 1955 after a Colorado Springs-based Sears Roebuck & Co. advertisement for children to call Santa misprinted the telephone number. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone number put kids through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations “hotline.” The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole. Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.  In 1958, the governments of Canada and the United States created a bi-national air defense command for North America called the North American Aerospace Defense Command, also known as NORAD, which then took on the tradition of tracking Santa.

Since that time, NORAD men, women, family and friends have selflessly volunteered their time to personally respond to phone calls and emails from children all around the world. In addition, we now track Santa using the internet. Millions of people who want to know Santa’s whereabouts now visit the NORAD Tracks Santa website.

Finally, media from all over the world rely on NORAD as a trusted source to provide updates on Santa’s journey.

What Route Does Santa Take?

Santa usually starts at the International Date Line in the Pacific Ocean and travels west. So, historically, Santa visits the South Pacific first, then New Zealand and Australia. After that, he shoots up to Japan, over to Asia, across to Africa, then onto Western Europe, Canada, the United States, Mexico and Central and South America. But keep in mind, Santa’s route can be affected by weather, so it’s really unpredictable. NORAD coordinates with Santa’s Elf launch staff to confirm his launch time, but from that point on, Santa calls the shots. NORAD just tracks him!

Does NORAD Have Statistics On Santa’s Sleigh?

NORAD can confirm that Santa’s sleigh is a versatile, all weather, multi-purpose, vertical short-take-off and landing vehicle. It is capable of traveling vast distances without refueling and is deployed, as far as we know, only on December 24th (and sometimes briefly for a test flight about a month before Christmas).

NewHartfordPlus is not responsible for the accuracy of the above data. We are merely making it available as a service for our readers.

 

Posted in BARKHAMSTED, Features, NEW HARTFORD0 Comments

A Pilgrimage To Newtown: A Personal Account

Gary Pontelandolfo: NH+ INDEPENDENT

I had been feeling drawn to visit the town of Sandy Hook to pay my respects after last Friday’s events, but out of respect for the community and a desire not to be in the way or somehow add to the heavy burden people there are carrying, I had stayed away. But after talking with a friend who had made an unplanned stop there late Sunday evening as she drove past the town on her way back from New York, I was beginning to feel like it might be ok to visit myself. Arriving after the President had left town, one of the first people she met as she got out of her car was a woman offering her a brownie from a plate she was carrying. She felt welcomed by the people in town and was glad she had decided to stop.

20121220_GP_bridge_flSo today I finally decided to drive down there myself and, after a late breakfast, I headed down Route 8 to Route 84 and on to Newtown. The village of Sandy Hook is about a half mile north of Route 84 and can be reached from either of two adjacent exits off the highway, the main roads from which meet in a T at the light in the middle of town. There was a bit of traffic when I arrived at about 1:30, but I didn’t have any trouble making my way to the center. I decided to pull into the driveway of St. John’s Church when traffic started to back up just as I got near the main intersection; I pulled around back and drove into the connected, nearly empty parking lot of a neighboring restaurant.

During the last half hour of my drive I had been listening to a radio interview with Newtown resident John Woodall, a psychiatrist who has had a great deal of experience working in communities around the world that have been affected by violent trauma. As radio host Colin McEnroe commented, it was as if he had spent his life training to help the people of his own town at this time.

One of the things Dr. Woodall talked about was the importance of reformulating grief into constructive pursuits that provide noble meaning, rather than stagnating in fear or anger. He has found that when presented with horrific circumstances, people time and again prove themselves to be wonderful, tender, loving, supportive, sacrificing, gracious and kind, and some of the most profound agents of change for better in the world are people who have suffered through unspeakable hardship. So with this conversation fresh in my mind, I made my way down the grassy hill from the parking lot to the heart of the village.

20121220_GP_teddy_flA State Police officer directed the slowly moving traffic at the light that was now set to blinking. The sound of the Pootatuck River could be heard in the background as it flowed over rounded rocks after passing under the bridge just west of the intersection. Hand-painted banners hung from buildings, and everywhere you looked, people had left teddy bears, candles, posters, photos, ornaments hanging from the branches of trees. The main sentiment expressed in these displays seemed to be one of compassion, support and solidarity in the midst of grief. Many local businesses had hung identical signs printed in green and white (the elementary school’s colors) that stated: “We Are Sandy Hook — We Choose Love.”

I walked up one side of Church Hill Road and, after passing the Methodist Church, turned around and started back down on the other side. People were continually arriving from all directions carrying stuffed animals, posters and other offerings for the growing memorials. As I stood on the sidewalk near the light, a car window rolled open and a woman asked if I would open her rear door and take the candle that was resting on the seat and add it to the shrine. She and her husband had driven up from Bridgeport and were obviously somewhat overcome by the scene they had come upon. We chatted for a few moments until traffic began to move, and as they left they thanked me for placing the candle for them. I felt honored, and approached a man on the other side of the street, asking if he had a light. As he handed me his lighter, he mentioned that his friends in Georgia were very interested in knowing how the people of Sandy Hook were doing. It turns out that he himself lives in Georgia; he is a trucker who was returning from a run to upstate New York. He said he had earlier collected fifteen or so stuffed animals from other drivers at a truck stop, and had dropped them off on his way north; he had parked his rig up the road now on his way back home.

At one point as I stood there in the center of the village, a school bus with the logo “Town of Newtown” approached and stopped right in front of me. I decided not to turn away and with respectful intention looked at the faces of what I would guess were middle school kids who were looking out. I can’t really describe the expression on their faces, but as the bus pulled away I wanted to cry. I imagine that there had been a conscious decision on the part of school administrators not to detour away from what I can only surmise was their normal daily route. My hope and belief is that though seeing the memorial must have made the loss the community had suffered even more poignant, witnessing the great outpouring of love and solidarity that was being expressed might be a comfort and provide some source of strength for them.

20121220_GP_clothing_flI spoke with a few local residents about how they were feeling about all the people who were streaming into their town (my guess is that the overwhelming majority of people who drove through and were walking around while I was there were visitors). A high school-age girl who had set up a card table on the sidewalk and was collecting donations for the families said that she really appreciated that so many people cared enough to come to their town, but that they weren’t used to this kind of activity in their normally quiet little village. The chief warden of St. John’s Church, who I met on my way back to my car and who lives just up the street, told me that it was very weird to see national news broadcasts from places like the footbridge over the river that he walks across every day. Last Friday, the first TV news he saw showed the reporter standing in front of Sandy Hook Firehouse, almost next door to his house. He said that although he sincerely appreciates the outpouring of support and understands people’s desire to come pay their respects, he is ready to have the crowds start to thin out so he can have his town back. It was now around 4:00 and traffic had backed up so far that he had parked his car up the road and walked to the church. He was there to gratefully gather packages that arrived daily with unsolicited donations of a variety of items that were being donated to his church and the wider community.

The church warden pointed out to me that there were even more memorials set up outside the firehouse just a short walk up Riverside Road. The road had been narrowed by orange plastic cones to create a walkway, and the road was closed to all but essential traffic. I walked up a small hill past Apex Glass on the right, which displayed a hand-written sign near the road that said: “We Love the Teachers and Children of Sandy Hook.” Across the street were the old, worn headstones in no-longer used Sandy Hook Cemetery (1813-1942). Then, as I came over the crest of the hill I saw and heard off to my right something that nearly took my breath away — there by the side of the building housing the Senior Center, Visiting Nurses Association and Children’s Adventure Center was a playground with yellow plastic slides and swings. The voices of young children at play rang out from the slight distance, while behind them, through a thin stand of trees, I could see the flashing red and blue lights of a police cruiser parked near Sandy Hook Elementary School. My guess is that these kids were perhaps five or six years old — and while I was happy to witness them exuberantly at play, I could only wonder how the parents of those who were so violently torn away last week would react when hearing such sounds.

When I got to the spot where the long driveway down to the school met Riverside Road, a group of official vehicles passed through. This was not by any means the first time I had witnessed such a procession while in town; in fact, I had seen police cruisers from all around the state. As I looked down the drive toward the school, I could see more than a few officers gathered in small groups. There was no temptation to venture down that way, and I am sure that anyone who did would be quietly yet firmly turned away. Appropriately, it seemed, the school building itself could not be seen from that vantage point, as it lies nestled behind a curve in the drive.

At the firehouse I spoke with Ken Carlson, a lifetime member of Sandy Hook Volunteer Fire and Rescue. When I offered that he must be tired and then began to apologize for such an understatement, he beat me to uttering the single word: “Exhausted.” He said he didn’t know where they were finding the energy to keep going, but of course they were. In reply to my question about how we in other towns could help, he suggested sending monetary donations directly to Sandy Hook Fire Department, 18 Riverside Road, Sandy Hook, CT 06482; you may include a note to indicate if you would like your donation to be passed on directly to affected families, or if you would like to support the volunteer fire company — whose members have been working so tirelessly and which has undoubtedly incurred extraordinary unanticipated expenses.

When I had made my way back to the center of the village, I decided to see if the restaurant I had parked behind might have coffee on. Although there were only a few more cars in the lot than when I had first arrived and no one could be seen through the windows of their dinig room, I spotted the flicker of a TV and found the take-out entrance unlocked. When I tried to pay the waitress for the coffee she had graciously poured me, the owner waved her off from behind her in the kitchen. A free cup of coffee — just another small kindness in an afternoon spent in the midst of kindness and compassion and, dare I say, profound Love.

 

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Dae Yen Sa Buddhist Temple To Hold Special Newtown Memorial Ceremony On Wednesday, December 19

We received the following invitation from the Dae Yen Sa International Buddhist Temple to a special memorial ceremony on Wednesday, December 19 for those affected by the violence in Newtown:

Dae Yen Sa International Buddhist Temple and Meditation Center invites you and your loved ones to a special memorial ceremony to offer shared intentions of compassion and peace to all affected by the violence in Newtown. The ceremony will take place from 7-9 PM on Wednesday, December 19 at the temple, located at 19 Kinsey Road in New Hartford.

Please come to be present with your feelings and those of others. We will be creating space for universal wisdom and lovingkindness to touch and heal our hearts, and abide in the serenity of fellowship.

We look forward to sharing this special evening as family — sisters and brothers supporting and loving one another and all people and beings everywhere.

May you be peaceful, happy and well, free from harm and grief.

The Dae Yen Sa temple is located at 19 Kinsey Road in New Hartford. For more information please call the temple at 860-489-3254. Also check out the Dae Yen Sa Temple Facebook page.

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Wednesday evening study at Dae Yen Sa Buddhist Temple. Image from Dae Yen Sa Facebook page

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Former Olympian Dan Alon To Memorialize ’72 Massacre In Northwest Connecticut: A GLANCE WITHIN

We received the following press release from Chabad Lubavitch in Litchfield:

Olympic Fencer from the ’72 Israeli delegation will tell of the friends he lost

As this year’s Israeli delegation prepares to head to London to compete in the 2012 Olympics, Chabad of Northwest CT will be remembering the courageous athletes from the ’72 Munich Games.

“The Olympics are a symbol of freedom and peace between nations” says Dan Alon, an Olympic Fencer from the ’72 Israeli delegation, who will be coming from Israel to address the Northwest CT community and sign his new book “Munich Memoirs” on August 12, 2012 at 10:00 am at Chabad Community Center, 7 Village Green Drive, Litchfield CT.

Alon, a survivor of the Munich Massacre, is featured in the documentary “The Eleventh Day: The Survivors of Munich ’72″.

Olympics massacre memorial in Tel Aviv, Israel

Alon began fencing when he was only twelve years old and quickly made a name for himself, earning bragging rights as Israel’s Junior Champion, and following national service, Israel’s National Champion.

Born in Tel Aviv, Dan, like many other athletes today, had a singular dream – to participate in the Olympics.

Dan will speak about his own experiences at the Olympics, and recount the horrific events that occurred.

Weightlifters Moshe Weinstein and Joseph Romano, both whom Alon calls, “Tremendous human beings, and very dedicated athletes,” tried to fight off the terrorists, and as a result lost their lives.

In the world of sports, athletes relish the opportunity to represent their country at big sporting events such as the Olympics. But very few of them are faced with the life threatening situations that the Israeli delegation faced in Munich.

For the Israeli delegation, the Olympics wasn’t just a competition, it was a chance to show the world that the nation of Israel was thriving. They were the first Israeli team to compete since World War II and it was a once in a lifetime opportunity to show the world, that “We are here, and still alive!”  Alon remembers how close he was to making it to the semifinals. He had defeated his opponent in the first four rounds of his fencing quarterfinal, and needed just one victory to advance.

“My opponent won a few points, and all of a sudden he had defeated me five games to four.”

Athletics competitions are decided by mere milliseconds of a difference. A few milliseconds was the difference that some of the Israeli Olympians had, to try and save their teammates.

Though the games continued after the terrible massacre, according to Alon, “some of the players from various countries decided that in light of what had happened, they would pack their bags and return home – for this I applaud them.”

For Alon, and other Israeli Olympians, one of the most important aspects of the Olympics is that they know the people of Israel will always be by their side. Some of the pain and suffering he felt returning to Israel after the massacre was alleviated when he stepped off the plane.

“When we landed at the airport, and I see these beautiful Israeli people, waiting for us – thousands of them, it was something I will never forget.”

Program Details:

Hear Dan Alon tell his story and sign his new book Munich Memoir. Following the lecture There will be a VIP lunch reception at a private Litchfield home (for Sponsors only).

The lecture and book signing will be held on Sunday August 12, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at Chabad, 7 Village Green Drive in Litchfield. The VIP Lunch will be held on Sunday August 12, 2012, at 12:00 p.m. in a private home in Litchfield. Reserve your seat at: www.chabadNW.org/munich or by calling 860-567-3609.

Tower Bridge sports the Olympic rings in readiness for the 2012 Olympics in London which will begin in 4 days. Photo: Olympic.org website

A GLANCE WITHIN highlights the news from our local spiritual communities whose good works and thoughtful events enrich the lives of everyone in our community: Good news indeed! Please send news of your spiritual community to maria@newhartfordplus.com for inclusion in this section.

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Giving Thanks To Those Who Give: St. John Celebrates Town’s Volunteers – A GLANCE WITHIN

By: Maria Moore

The good people of St. John’s looked out into the community and saw many in town volunteering their time to enrich all of our lives. They saw the countless hours donated by these community-minded residents whose efforts provide us with volunteer fire departments, a volunteer ambulance association, many sports activities and, of course, our town’s boards and commissions without whose efforts our form of government could not function. And so they decided to hold a ‘Community Thank You’ picnic to thank the town’s volunteers who give for the good of all.

Lucie Martocchio with 1st Selectman Dan Jerram

Between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Sunday afternoon, June 10, the members of St. John’s cooked up hamburgers and hot dogs, served up delicious salads and desserts, and all the while, they visited with their guests and played games with the children. And in the background live musicians played for the pleasure of all.

All the volunteers who attended the picninc agreed: It was a very nice, neighborly time, one at which they were able to stop by, eat and visit, and then go on with their Sunday plans. While in the background, the good people of St. John’s, were working hard on that Sunday to make it all happen.

The NewHartfordPlus crew attended the ‘Community Thank You’ and they, too, enjoyed the food and camaraderie at the picnic. And for once, Maria left her camera in the car. Luckily for her, Rev. Salin Low was on duty on the photography front.

St. John’s Episcopal Church is located on the Green at Chapin Park in the Pine Meadow section of New Hartford. For more information about the church and the members’ various outreach programs please visit St. John’s website.
Many Thanks: To Rev. Salin Low for sharing her photos of the ‘Community Thank You’ with our readers.

Special Thanks: To Lucie and Lou Martocchio, members of St. John’s, for their hard work and hospitality which helped make the ‘Community Thank You’ picnic such a successful event.

Fun and games at the ‘Community Thank You’. Photo: Rev. Salin Low

Volunteers enjoying the camaraderie at the ‘Community Thank You’ picnic on the Green at Chapin Park hosted by St. John’s Episcopal Church. Photo: Rev. Salin Low

A GLANCE WITHIN highlights the news from our local spiritual communities whose good works enrich the lives of everyone in our community: Good news indeed! Please send news of your spiritual community to maria@newhartfordplus.com for inclusion in this section.

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Temple Beth Israel To Celebrate 100th Anniversary With Broadway Music Program: A GLANCE WITHIN

Temple Beth Israel in Winsted is celebrating its 100th anniversary with a Broadway music program. Following is a press release from the temple inviting everyone in the community to join in the celebration:

Cantor Mark Perman

All are invited to Winsted’s Temple Beth Israel on Saturday, June 30, at 7 p.m. for a lively evening of Broadway music celebrating the temple’s century of service to the Jewish community of Winsted and neighboring towns. Featured will be Cantor Mark Perman of the Farmington Valley Jewish Congregation in Simsbury who will belt out familiar tunes and lead a musical adventure connecting both Jewish and theatrical music. Often accompanying himself on keyboard, Cantor Perman will also sing a cappella and invite audience participation. He first appeared on the Broadway stage at 8 years old, and this program has entertained audiences of all ages and persuasions.

The program is at Temple Beth Israel at 74 Park Place East in Winsted and will be followed by a dessert reception. There is a suggested donation of $5. Please join us for what promises to be a fun night of good music, conversation, and friendship.

For more information on the event contact Temple Beth Israel at 860-379-8923.

For more information on Cantor Perman go to www.mperman.com/bima-tobroadway.html. For a preview of the wonderful program scheduled at the temple tomorrow evening, listen to some of Cantor Perman’s recordings on the Music Samples section of his website. A personal favorite of the NewHartfordPlus crew is ‘We are loved by an unending love’ – just beautiful!

Temple Beth Israel was chartered on June 28, 1912, as the Winsted Hebrew Sick Benefit Society. The small group worshipped in a local meeting house and in town hall until 1925 when it purchased and renovated St. James Episcopal Church on Park Place, built in 1840. The 1955 flood destroyed the building. With only $165 in the treasury, dedicated congregants raised funds in small amounts and marshalled sweat equity so that in September 1957 the current building was erected on the original site.

Temple Beth Israel is located just a few doors down from Northwestern Community College at 74 Park Place in Winsted.  Photo is from 2011 and is from the NewHartfordPlus archives

A GLANCE WITHIN highlights news from our local spiritual communities whose good works enrich the lives of everyone in our community: Good news indeed! Please send news of your spiritual community to maria@newhartfordplus.com for inclusion in this section.

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‘Ashes To Go’ Offered To All Passers-By On Wednesday: St. John’s On Pine Meadow Green

A GLANCE WITHIN:

St. John’s Episcopal Church on the Pine Meadow Green is offering an innovative program, ‘Ashes To Go,’ to all passers-by this coming Wednesday, February 22. Following is information on that program.

On Wednesday, February 22, Ash Wednesday, St. John’s Episcopal Church will do something new – offer the imposition of ashes to those driving by the Pine Meadow Green on Route 44 in New Hartford. In order to make it easier for those who want to stop, the priest will be standing in front of the church during the morning (7:45 – 8:30 a.m.) and afternoon (4:30 -5:30 p.m.) commute times. She will say a short prayer and place ashes on the guest’s forehead in the shape of a cross, which will take only a few seconds. The recipient can then be on his or her way. This new effort will be in addition to the usual Ash Wednesday services at 7:00 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., which is for those with more time to worship.

The idea for Ashes to Go began in St. Louis in 2007 and spread to Chicago over the succeeding years. The impetus has been to take this meaningful practice into the world, reminding people that God meets us in the busy times and places of our lives. The ashes have most commonly been offered at train stations, the crossroads of our time.

The Rev. Salin Low, rector of St. John’s, saw an article about priests offering ashes at the train station in Stamford, Connecticut, and wondered how the service might be adapted to the New Hartford area. St. John’s is fortunate in being located on the Pine Meadow Green, which many cars pass going to and from work each day. The challenge is being visible without causing traffic problems. Ms. Low’s answer is to have a sign on the green with an arrow pointing to the church. She will stand in front of the church during the two time periods, ready to offer ashes to anyone who stops and requests them. Church membership is not a prerequsite. “We know that many people who have long commutes and busy lives cannot come to one of our two services on Ash Wednesday. We want them to know that we want to meet their spiritual needs on this and any day.”

For more information on St. John’s visit the church’s website.

To be included in A GLANCE WITHIN, send information about your community of faith’s activities to maria@newhartfordplus.com.

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